The Progressive Era to the New Era, 1900-1929

An introduction by Daniel Rodgers

We should not accept social life as it has “trickled down to us,” the young journalist Walter Lippmann wrote soon after the twentieth century began. “We have to deal with it deliberately, devise its social organization, . . . educate and control it.” The ambition to harness and organize the energies of modern life of which Lippmann spoke cut through American economy, politics, and society in many different, sometimes contradictory ways between 1900 and 1929, but it left virtually none of its major institutions unchanged. The modern business corporation, modern politics, the modern presidency, a modern vision of the international order, and modern consumer capitalism were all born in these years.More »

Sub Eras

Jim Crow and the Great Migration

With an introduction by Jonathan Scott Holloway, Professor of History, African American Studies, and American Studies, Yale UniversityMore »

The Politics of Reform

With an introduction by Julie Des Jardins, Associate Professor of History, Baruch College, City University of New YorkMore »

World War I

With an introduction by Jennifer D. Keene, Professor of History, Chapman UniversityMore »

The Roaring Twenties

With an introduction by Joshua Zeitz, Lecturer on American History, Cambridge UniversityMore »